Publication

The impact of High Performance Work Systems on the perceived work load of employees – two cases from the automotive and metal-working industry

Publication, 2013

Outline

M. Menrad, T. Wallner, W. Laskowski - The impact of High Performance Work Systems on the perceived work load of employees – two cases from the automotive and metal-working industry - Proceedings of the 20th EurOMA Conference, Dublin, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, 2013, pp. 1-10

Abstract

High Performance Work Systems (HPWSs) are considered to have great potential to generate substantial competitive advantages. High Performance Work Practices (HPWPs) comprise of particular management practices like self-managed teamwork, flat hierarchical structures, job rotation, performance related wages or workforce em-powerment to create an organization based on employee involvement. Concerning these practices we argue that although developed forms of a HPWS lead to more work – as competencies and tasks are shifted towards production workers – these additional ef-forts are not perceived negatively. On the contrary such opportunities to participate may even lead to a reduction in the perceived work load.