Publikation

Gender differences and the role of parental education, school types and migration on the body mass index of 2930 Austrian school children : A cross-sectional study.

Outline:

D. Furthner, A. Biebl, M. Ehrenmüller, G. Halmerbauer, K. Schmitt - Gender differences and the role of parental education, school types and migration on the body mass index of 2930 Austrian school children : A cross-sectional study. - WIENER KLINISCHE WOCHENSCHRIFT, Vol. 129, No. 21, 2017, pp. 786-792

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Austria faces increasing numbers of childhood overweight and obesity. Despite increasing numbers of studies, associations between parental body mass index (BMI) and education and the school type on overweight/obesity in students have not been reported. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the genesis of overweight/obesity in a large cohort representative of youth in Upper Austrian. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of data from 2930 children and adolescents aged 10, 14 or 17 years from 11 different state school types was conducted. Students and their parents completed a questionnaire and heights and weights were measured. RESULTS: Of the students 16.9% fulfilled the criteria for overweight and 5.6% for obesity, with the highest rates in the 10-year-olds (19.6% and 5.8%, respectively). While no gender differences were present in the youngest age group, the body mass index (BMI) during adolescence remained higher in boys but decreased significantly in girls. Male gender remained a risk factor through all calculations. Boys were overrepresented in schools with lower education levels and more often had BMIs ≥ 85th and ≥95th percentile. Higher parental education levels and lower parental BMIs were associated with lower BMIs of their offspring. Migration was an additional association factor for BMIs ≥ 85th percentile. CONCLUSION: Low parental education levels, higher parental BMIs and migration background were associated with overweight and obesity in 10-year-olds. In adolescence, male gender and higher parental BMIs remained risk factors.

2017

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